Fibrinogen structure

Fibrinogen (factor I) is a soluble plasma glycoprotein, synthesised by the liver, that is converted by thrombin into fibrin during blood coagulation. Fibrinogen is clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds.

Crystal structure of fibrinogen. The central nodule, formed by the N-terminal portions of all six chains, is connected to the distal β- and γ-nodules formed by the C-terminal portions of the Bβ and γ chains, respectively, by triple-helical coiled-coils, each formed by the middle portions of the Aα, Bβ and γ chains.

Crystal structure of fibrinogen. The central nodule, formed by the N-terminal portions of all six chains, is connected to the distal β- and γ-nodules formed by the C-terminal portions of the Bβ and γ chains, respectively, by triple-helical coiled-coils, each formed by the middle portions of the Aα, Bβ and γ chains.

2 thoughts on “Fibrinogen structure

  1. Hi – I am working in a laboratory that studies fibrinogen gene regulation and I discovered your excellent model of the fibrinogen structure. I noticed that on the left side of the image where you have the ‘α nodule’, this should actually be the ‘γ-nodule’. What you have written in the figure legend is correct, but the diagram label should be changed to match this.

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